#1 The Masks You Wear (Habitus)

We launch The Mountain Talks with the age old question, who are we, and how did we become who we are?

This episode jumps right into the discussion of Habitus and how we construct our identities to fit into groups and crowds that we see successful or interesting. But sometimes these masks we wear don’t fully cover the history we seek to cover. Next, we discuss Dramaturgy: the theory that we are actors on a stage performing for each other. From there, we talk about the 2004 teen comedy, Mean Girls. Then, we discuss Ferdinand Demara, the infamous Canadian imposter who faked several different professions. Last, we end with a discussion about those who are not so good at faking their identity—posers.

**CORRECTION**

  1. Mean Girls, a 2004 teen comedy

MUSIC

REFERENCES

Goffman, Erving, Charles C. Lemert, and Ann Branaman. 1997. “The Goffman Reader .” Retrieved (http://sfu.summon.serialssolutions.com).

Jenkins, Richard. 1992. “Pierre Bourdieu .” Retrieved (http://sfu.summon.serialssolutions.com).

Melady, John. 2011. Korea: Canada’s Forgotten War. Toronto, ON, CAN: Dundurn Group. Retrieved (http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sfu/docDetail.action?docID=10560429).

Salih, Sara and Judith Butler. 2004. “The Judith Butler Reader .” Retrieved (http://sfu.summon.serialssolutions.com).

Script (rough)

The Mountain Talks Story 1:”Habitus” INTRODUCTION

STUART Hey I’m here with Lee

LEE
And I’m here with Stuart

STUART
And this is The Mountain Talks, where

we seek to understand our lives through the power of social science. (Thunder Sound effect, and heavy reverb lol)

THEME MUSIC FADE IN QUIET

LEE
Bringing together personal stories,

pop culture, and academic theory, Stuart and I will attempt to piece together a better understanding of ourselves, each other, and the world around us.

STUART I’m excited!

THEME MUSIC PLAYS
THEME MUSIC BEGINS TO FADE

TEASER
(it’s a beautiful day on the

mountain, etc. Etc.)

STUART (music)

Some would call me a social chameleon, like most of us are. For my entire life I’ve been learning, watching, and pretty much imitating identities that depict wealth, or social prestige ——most likely because I was raised in a lower income family.

THEME MUSIC

And to break this shortcoming, I first thought artists had the answer, So I became a musician, and began to dress, talk and act in such away that allowed me, Stuart, to fit in to the music crowed that I so passionately surrounded myself by. But music didn’t give me the social mobility I needed. So I decided to aim for something different, I decided go to University. There, again, I learned to dress, talk, and fit into a crowed of individuals, in this case academics, that I thought I wanted to be apart of. Yet, as hard as I tried to do this, in both examples, little bits from my past identities, like how I pronounce words or the type of music I listen to, would reveal my true identity to the people around me, almost like I was an imposter, poser, I just simply didn’t belong.

Huh, the Jig is up buddy…

But this is my personal story. I believe most of you have experienced similar situations in life where you felt the need to change the way you dress, speak, or act so that you could fit into a certain group or clique. Maybe you…[insert universal example]

STUART
Today’s Episode on [podcast], Lee and

I will be investigating this phenomena of past identities, tastes, and so much more.

SCENE I: “WHAT”

(we chat a bit here.)

LEE *indication of amazement*

*Habitus* Bordieu Dramaturgy?

STUART

Mean Girls
a 2004 American teen comedy written by Tina Fey, and directed by Mark Waters.

2.

For those who haven’t seen this film, I highly recommend watching it. For those who haven’t, the story is basically about a 16-year-old girl, named Cady, who has been home-schooled by her zoologist parents in Africa for 12 years. The story begins with the family moving back to the United States, where Cady is essentially expected to reintegrated into an American high-school riddled with like different various social cliques. She is first accepted and befriended by two social outcasts who have somewhat of a vendetta towards the most popular, and exclusive clique in school named the Plastics, Which is a Trio of girls led by a queen bee Regina. Now this is where the story gets interesting, and more relevant to todays topic, Cady is spotted by the Plastics, and is seen as a possible project for them. They want to see if they can make a nobody somebody. On the other hand, Cady and her two newfound outcast friends see this as a perfect opportunity to infiltrate the Plastics, and destroy them once and for all. But the plan doesn’t quite workout that way. Cady not only starts looking like the Plastics, but she begins to act like them to. Ironically she becomes a— Quote: Mean Girl, and is disowned by her previous friends.

(Discussion)
Throughout this film Cady goes through

several identity changes to seek acceptance from different social groups.

END OF SCENE I

SCENE II: “WHY”

STUART
To become someone, goffman pretty

3.

woman
To avoid punishment, butler

LEE

EITHER
But essentially this is the same

thing, right? To elicit a specific response from this around us. Goffman contract idea

END OF SCENE TWO

SCENE III: “HOW AND HOW NOT”

STUART
How i became me, dramaturgy, Ferdinand

example

So I have found a pretty interesting story I would like to share with you Lee. It’s about, what I would argue, a person who is in complete control over their habitus. Some called Him the Great Imposter of the 19th century, AND! He’s a fellow Canadian.

Ferdinand Waldo Demara, throughout his lifetime has posed, without qualifications, as a monk for multiple religious orders, a doctor of psychology, dean of a school of philosophy in Pennsylvania, a law student, a zoology graduate, a career researcher, a teacher at a junior collage in Maine, and an assistant warden at a Texas prison.

But that’s not all. On a Tuesday morning, March 13th, 1951, Demara posed as a doctor named Dr. Joseph Cyr, and offered his services as a doctor to the Royal Canadian Navy at Saint John, New Brunswick. There after Demara worked at a navel hospital in Nova Scotia for three months.

After three months of just ramming patience full of penicillin and referring the sick to other doctors, Demara received orders to report to Esquimalt, British Columbia, for assignment to Korea as a military surgeon for the Korean War.

4.

Not only did Demara look the part, but he also performed several successful life threatening surgeries, one including a man shot through the lung.

Once caught, Demara then went on to become somewhat of a celebrity on TV, opened a collage, and finally posed as a hospital priest.

LEE
Posers – breaking the contract (Is

there a theorist that talks about breaking contracts?)

STUART
Unintentional messages – dickies pants

END SCENE III
SCENE 3.5: “ON THE CONTRARY”

EITHER
Is everything a mask? Maybe there is a

true self that shines through. maaaaybe briefly mention one more theorist here

(maybe we can talk about the Venetian masks, and Actors)

SCENE IV: “CONCLUSION”

EITHER Everyone is wearing a mask

But this isn’t deception, you are the mask you’ve created

(positive note goes here)
We have agency over who we are and who we become. While upward mobility isn’t as accessible as movies would have you believe, it is possible.
OR
Just because we manufacture ourselves doesn’t mean our feelings are any less valid. In fact this power over ourselves means we can express ourselves with every ounce of our beings.

5.

FADE OUT WITH MUSIC

EITHER
Thank you all for listening, this has

been “The Mountain Talks” with Stuart and Lee. Tune in next time

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